July 1: Beate Paulus prays for tuition

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Another true account of answered prayer by Daniel Whittle, featuring the woman we met yesterday, Beate Paulus. God can still provide for tuition today!

The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith the Lord of hosts.

Haggai 2:8

At another time Beate found herself unable to pay the expenses of the children’s schooling, and the repeated demands for money were rendered more grievous by the reproaches of her husband, who charged her with attempting impossibilities, and told her that her self-will would involve them in disgrace. She, however, professed her unwavering confidence that the Lord would soon interpose for their relief, while his answer was: “We shall see; time will show.”

In the midst of these trying circumstances, as her husband was one day sitting in his study, absorbed in meditation, the postman brought three letters from different towns where the boys were at school, each declaring that unless the dues were promptly settled, the lads would be dismissed. The father read the letters with growing excitement, and spreading them out upon the table before his wife as she entered the room, exclaimed: “There, look at them, and pay our debt with your faith! I have no money, nor can I tell where to go for any.”

“Seizing the papers, she rapidly glanced through them, with a very grave face, but then answered firmly, ‘It is all right; the business shall be settled. For He who says, “The gold and silver is mine,” will find it an easy thing to provide these sums.’ Saying which she hastily left the room.

“Our father readily supposed she intended making her way to a certain rich friend who had helped us before. He was mistaken, for this time her steps turned in a different direction. We had in the parsonage an upper loft, shut off by a trap-door from the lower one, and over this door it was that she now knelt down, and began to deal with Him in whose strength she had undertaken the work of her children’s education.

She spread before Him those letters from the study table, and told Him of her husband’s half scoffing taunt. She also reminded Him how her life had been redeemed from the very gates of death, for the children’s sake, and then declared that she could not believe that He meant to forsake her at this juncture; she was willing to be the second whom He might forsake, but she was determined not to be the first.

“In the meanwhile, her husband waited down stairs, and night came on; but she did not appear. Supper was ready, and yet she stayed in the loft. Then the eldest girl, her namesake Beate, ran up to call her; but the answer was, ‘Take your supper without me, it is not time for me to eat.’ Late in the evening, the little messenger was again dispatched, but returned with the reply: ‘Go to bed; the time has not come for me to rest.’ A third time, at breakfast next morning, the girl called her mother. ‘Leave me alone,’ she said; ‘I do not need breakfast; when I am ready I shall come.’ Thus the hours sped on, and down stairs her husband and the children began to feel frightened, not daring, however, to disturb her any more.

At last the door opened, and she entered, her face beaming with a wonderful light. The little daughter thought that something extraordinary must have happened; and running to her mother with open arms, asked eagerly: ‘What is it? Did an angel from heaven bring the money?’ ‘No, my child,’ was the smiling answer, ‘but now I am sure that it will come.’

She had hardly spoken, when a maid in peasant costume entered, saying: ‘The master of the Linden Inn sends to ask whether the Frau Pastorin can spare time to see him?’ ‘Ah, I know what he wants,’ answered our mother. ‘My best regards, and I will come at once.’

Whereupon she started, and mine host, looking out of his window, saw her from afar, and came forward to welcome her with the words: ‘O Madame, how glad I am you have come!’ Then leading her into his back parlor he said; ‘I cannot tell how it is, but the whole of this last night I could not sleep for thinking of you. For some time I have had several hundred gulden lying in that chest, and all night long I was haunted by the thought that you needed this money, and that I ought to give it to you. If that be the case, there it is–take it; and do not trouble about repaying me. Should you be able to make it up again, well and good–if not, never mind.’

On this my mother said: ‘Yes, I do most certainly need it, my kind friend; for all last night I too was awake, crying to God for help. Yesterday there came three letters, telling us that all our boys would he dismissed unless the money for their board is cleared at once.’

“‘Is it really so?’ exclaimed the innkeeper, who was a noble-hearted and spiritual Christian man. ‘How strange and wonderful! Now I am doubly glad I asked you to come!’ Then opening the chest, he produced three weighty packets, and handed them to her with a prayer that God’s blessing might rest upon the gift.

She accepted it with the simple words: ‘May God make good to you this service of Christian sympathy; for you have acted as the steward of One who has promised not even to leave the giving of a cup of cold water unrewarded.’

“Husband and children were eagerly awaiting her at home, and those three dismal letters still lay open on the table, when the mother, who had quitted that study in such deep emotion the day before, stepped up to her husband, radiant with joy. On each letter, she laid a roll of money and then cried: ‘Look, there it is! And now believe that faith in God is no empty madness!'”

And God is able to make all grace abound toward you; that ye, always having all sufficiency in all things, may abound to every good work:

2 Corinthians 9:8

June 30: A Mother’s Faith – The Life of Beate Paulus

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle shares with us the faith of a mother:

Beate Paulus was the wife of a German minister who lived on the borders of the Black Forest. She has several incidents which illustrate the power of living faith, and the providence of a prayer-hearing God.

Though destitute of wealth, she much desired to educate her children, and five of her six boys were placed in school, while she struggled, and prayed, and toiled,–not only in the house, but out of doors,–to provide for their necessities.

“On one occasion,” writes one of her children, “shortly before harvest, the fields stood thick with corn, and our mother had already calculated that their produce would suffice to meet all claims for the year. She was standing at the window casting the matter over in her mind, with great satisfaction, when her attention was suddenly caught by some heavy, black clouds with white borders, drifting at a great rate across the Summer sky. ‘It is a hail-storm!’ she exclaimed in dismay, and quickly throwing up the window, she leaned out. Her eyes rested upon a frightful mass of wild storm-clouds, covering the western horizon, and approaching with rapid fury.

“‘O God!’ she cried, ‘there comes an awful tempest, and what is to become of my corn?’ The black masses rolled nearer and nearer, while the ominous rushing movement that precedes a storm, began to rock the sultry air, and the dreaded hail-stones fell with violence. Half beside herself with anxiety about those fields lying at the eastern end of the valley, she now lifted her hands heavenward, and wringing them in terror, cried: ‘Dear Father in heaven, what art thou doing? Thou knowest I cannot manage to pay for my boys at school, without the produce of those fields! Oh! turn Thy hand, and do not let the hail blast my hopes!’

Scarcely, however, had these words crossed her lips when she started, for it seemed to her as if a voice had whispered in her ear,’ Is my arm shortened that it cannot help thee in other ways?’ Abashed, she shrank into a quiet corner, and there entreated God to forgive her want of faith. In the meantime the storm passed. And now various neighbors hurried in, proclaiming that the whole valley lay thickly covered with hail-stones, down to the very edge of the parsonage fields, but the latter had been quite spared. The storm had reached their border, and then suddenly taking another direction into the next valley. Moreover, that the whole village was in amazement, declaring that God had wrought a miracle for the sake of our mother, whom he loved. She listened, silently adoring the goodness of the Lord, and vowing that henceforth her confidence should be only in Him.”

Behold, the LORD’S hand is not shortened, that it cannot save; neither his ear heavy, that it cannot hear:

Isaiah 59:1

June 29: The American George Mueller

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Another account from Daniel Whittle:

In the United States there is a Parallel Record to George Mailer’s Life of Faith and Trust, found in the history of the Consumptive’s Home [A hospital for incurables] of Boston, Mass. It was established in 1873, (twelve years before Mr. Whittle’s book was published) by Doctor Cullis, who in the ardor of his faith and trust gave himself to the work of the Lord, by ministering in Jesus’ Name, to the poor consumptives who were unable to provide for themselves. Doctor Cullis is a man of humility, and devoted to his life work, and has been most abundantly blessed by the Lord in his field. To the honor and glory of our Heavenly Father, he has never been forsaken by Him.

Boston Consumptive's Home
Boston Consumptive’s Home

The Institution began twelve years ago, in small quarters. Now it
embraces a very large gathering of useful enterprises: A Consumptive’s
Home, Children’s Home, Grove Hall Church, Tract Repository, a Training
College, and a Cancer Home. The means provided have all been sent by
the Lord, who has prompted the hearts of good people to send to it their
voluntary contributions.

There is no financial fund, endowment, or pecuniary provision whatever existing for the support of the Home. No individuals have made any agreement for its support; there is no trade or occupation used or connected with it, whereby to obtain any remuneration. There has never been any appeal to man for assistance, no subscriptions ever taken, no contributions solicited, either publicly or privately; there are no agencies or connections to receive funds from any religious society for procuring charitable relief.

The supplies for the carrying on of this work, during these twelve
years, have been wholly in answer to believing prayer, to the Lord.

They have fulfilled faithfully the Lord’s commands, “Cast all your
cares on Him, for he careth for you.” They have also pleaded in faith,
without a doubt, “Anything ye shall ask the Father in my name, I will
do it.” And they have asked and received, and the Provider has never
yet failed them.

During the twelve years’ time there has been sent to the Consumptive’s
Home, without any solicitation whatever, but in answer to believing
prayer and faith and trust in God’s providence, a sum no less than
three hundred and sixty thousand dollars [that’s over $9.5 million dollars in 2019] and over fifteen hundred patients have been gratuitously cared for. No one has been urged, asked, or even hinted to contribute to it. Each morning, noon and night prayer has been offered to send means to provide for their daily wants, and the Great Shepherd has sent the supplies.

During these twelve years, the experiences of Doctor Cullis, the
founder, have been most remarkable in the frequent answers to prayer in minute details of life, and especially in healing. There are so many such cases, that there is no possible room to doubt. There have often been moments, yes, days of distress and intense trial, when, with not a single penny on hand, it seemed as if failure had come; but faith could not let the promise go, neither was it possible for them to believe that He who could do so much, would forsake so good a work, which was undertaken only in obedience to the guidance and direction of the Lord; and God has always brought deliverance, and honored them and brought glory to his own name.

June 28: Waiting on the Lord

We’ll take a break from Daniel Whittle to address another aspect of prayer. This is from a very good friend of mine:

How many times have you been so troubled with a specific need that you feel agitated, upset, and find it hard to concentrate on anything else?

We pray and pray again and ask God to help in this need, often knowing there is nothing we can do but wait and pray some more.

What comfort do we have from God’s word while we wait? What promises can we can cling to?  Many times it is helpful to put a verse (or several!) on the mirror, on the car dash, on your phone or computer screensaver, on the refrigerator… places we will see them often to be reminded to trust in God as we pray, and find comfort in Him.

Here are some promises that have meant a lot to me and maybe will be a blessing to you also:

Philippians 4:6
Philippians 4:6
1 Peter 5:7
1 Peter 5:7
Isaiah 26:3
Isaiah 26:3
Psalm 46:10
Psalm 46:10

June 27: Prayers for healing from addiction

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Heal me, O Lord, and I shall be healed; save me, and I shall be saved: for thou art my praise.

Jeremiah 17:14

Daniel Whittle shares an account of someone freed from addiction to tobacco:

“I had used tobacco from my childhood, and the love and use thereof grew upon me. I became convicted of its sinfulness, went to God and said, ‘Destroy the appetite, and give me power over it. Save me that I may glorify thee as a God of power for our present sins, and I will glorify thee ever more.’ I wrote out the contract and signed it, and from that blessed afternoon have no recollection of ever desiring it even.”

Yes, God can change our desires! He can give us new desires!

Delight thyself also in the Lord: and he shall give thee the desires of thine heart.

Psalm 37:4

June 26: The blessing of still waters

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Providential delays – are the works of Providence! Not mere coincidence, but a superintending God who works all things for Good. Here’s another account from Daniel Whittle.

Thou rulest the raging of the sea: when the waves thereof arise, thou stillest them.

Psalm 89:9

A Sea Captain relates to the editor of the Christian, a remarkable incident, whereby in one of his voyages his ship was unaccountably held still, and thereby saved from sailing directly into the midst of a terrible hurricane: — “We sailed from the Kennebec on the first of October, 1876. There had been several severe gales, and some of my friends thought it hardly safe to go, but after considerable prayer I concluded it was right to undertake the voyage. On the 19th of October we were about one hundred and fifty miles west of the Bahamas, and we encountered very disagreeable weather. For five or six days we seemed held by shifting currents, or some unknown power, in about the same place. We would think we had sailed thirty or forty miles, when on taking our observations we would find we were within three or four miles of our position the day before. This circumstance occurring repeatedly proved a trial to my faith, and I said within my heart, ‘Lord, why are we so hindered, and kept in this position?’ Day after day we were held as if by an unseen force, until at length a change took place, and we went on our way. Reaching our port they inquired, ‘Where have you been through the gale?’ ‘What gale?’ we asked. ‘We have seen no gale.’ We then learned that a terrible hurricane had swept through that region, and that all was desolation. We afterwards learned that this hurricane had swept around us, and had almost formed a circle around the place occupied by us during the storm. A hundred miles in one direction all was wreck and ruin, fifty miles in the opposite direction all was desolation; and while that storm was raging in all its fury, we were held in perfect safety, in quiet waters, and in continual anxiety to change our position and pursue our voyage One day of ordinary sailing would have brought us into the track of the storm, and sent us to the bottom of the sea. We were anxious to sail on, but some unseen power held us where we were, and we escaped.”

The Captain was a prayerful man, trusting in his Lord, though his faith was tried, and he thought the Lord was not helping him. Yet the Lord was keeping his promise to him, “The beloved of the Lord shall dwell in safety by him, and the Lord shall cover him all the day long.”

June 25: Jehovah-Jireh – The LORD Will Provide!

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

And Abraham called the name of that place Jehovah-jireh: as it is said to this day, In the mount of the Lord it shall be seen.

Genesis 22:14

Daniel Whittle shares with us the account of a Christian woman who was on the verge of doubting the LORD’s ability to provide:

About the month of January, 1863, I was living in Connecticut, alone with two little boys, one of them four years old, and the other about a year and a half old. My husband was away in the service of his country.

When the coldest weather came, I was nearly out of wood. I went down into the village, one day, to try and get some, but tried in vain; so many men were away in the army that help was scarce. Very little wood was brought into market, and those living on the main street, got all that came, while those who lived outside the village could get none. I tried to buy a quarter of a cord from two or three merchants, but could not get any. One of them told me he could not get what he wanted for his own family. Another said he wasn’t willing to yoke up his team for so small a quantity; but, as I only had a dollar and seventy-five cents, I could not buy any more, and so I was obliged to go home without any.

I went back to my little ones, feeling very sad. But while I sat there, almost ready to cry, the words of Abraham came into my mind, ‘Jehovah- Jireh, the Lord will provide.’

Then I went up to my chamber. There I knelt down and told God of my trouble, and asked him to help me and send the relief that we needed. Then I went to the window and waited, looking down the street, expecting to see the wood coming.

After waiting a while, without seeing any come, my faith began to fail. I said to myself, ‘The Lord did provide for Abraham, but He won’t provide for me.’

Our last stick of wood was put in the stove. It was too cold to keep the children in the house without fire. I got the children’s clothes out, and thought I would take them to the house of a kind neighbor, where I knew they could stay till we got some wood.

But, just as I was going out with the children, in passing by the window, I saw the top of a great load of wood coming up the road towards our little house. Can that be for us? I asked myself.

Presently I saw the wagon turn off the road and come up towards our door. Then I was puzzled to know how to pay for it. A dollar and seventy-five cents I knew would only go a little way towards paying for all that wood.

The oxen came slowly on, dragging the load to our door. I asked the man if there wasn’t same mistake about it. ‘No, ma’am,’ said he, ‘there’s no mistake.’

‘I did not order it, and I cannot pay for it,’ was my reply. ‘Never mind, ma’am,’ said he, ‘a friend ordered it, and it is all paid for.’ Then he unhitched the oxen from the wagon, and gave them some hay to eat. When this was done, he asked for a saw and ax, and never stopped till the whole load was cut and split and piled away in the woodshed.

“This was more than I could stand. My feelings overcame me, and I sat down and cried like a child. But these were not bitter tears of sorrow. They were tears of joy and gladness, of gratitude and thankfulness. I felt ashamed of myself for doubting God’s word, and I prayed that I might never do so again.

What pleasure I had in using that wood! Every stick of it, as I took it up, seemed to have a voice with which to say ‘Jehovah-Jireh.’ As Abraham stood on the top of Mount Moriah he could say, ‘The Lord will provide.’ But every day, as I went into our woodshed, I could point to that blessed pile of wood sent from heaven, and say, ‘The Lord does provide.'”

June 24: A Powerful Dream

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Matthew 6:26 says “Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they?” But how often do we rely on that promise? Daniel Whittle shares a story from a son who saw God work in his family growing up.

“My father, a minister of the gospel, was prostrated by sickness. A large family of little ones was dependent upon him for support. Funds ran low. One evening my mother remarked that she had broken the last dollar. My father lay awake most of the night, praying to his God for help in this emergency. That same night a man in a parish not many miles distant was much impressed by a dream. He dreamed that a minister who preached in his church not long before, was sick and in want. He knew neither his name nor his place of residence. He arose at the first dawn of day, and going to his own pastor inquired the name and address of the stranger who had recently preached for them. These obtained, he mounted his horse, and knocked at our door just as my mother drew up the window-shades. She answered the knock, when, without a word, a stranger placed an envelope in her hand and immediately rode away. The envelope contained a ten-dollar bill, which we all believed was the Lord’s answer to our father’s prayer. Afterwards these facts were disclosed by the pastor to him whom the Lord chose to disperse his bounty.”

June 23: Is God in control of horses?

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Today we worry about how to make an appointment when our flight is cancelled. In the 1800s they had the same worry – if a train was cancelled! Here’s a fascinating account from the pre-GPS era! From Daniel Whittle:

A man was preaching Sundays at a little country church, about 70 miles by rail from the institution where he attended. He went Saturday, returning on Monday.

One Saturday the train ran off the track. All day long they worked at the wreck. At last, finding it too late to make connection with the other railroad, he took the down train back to the institution.

What should be done? A promise to preach forty miles across the country had been made. There was also an appointment six miles beyond for an afternoon service.

It was now night. To ride by horse across the country was the only way open, or stay at home. Two disappointed congregations the result in the latter case. But the roads were heavy from recent rains.

‘Twill be so late that none can direct. Friends said, ‘Stay; you can’t go forty miles across, to you, an unknown country.’

But the man felt it duty to go. Hiring a horse noted for endurance, at nine o’clock at night — dark, threatening — he set out. As he headed the horse in the direction of the village — for he could find none who could tell him the exact road — he prayed: ‘O God, starting out to preach thy word to-morrow, direct the way — guide this horse.’

The night wore on; as cross-roads came, dropping the lines over the dashboard, the same prayer was offered. When the horse chose a road, the driver urged him on.

As day began to break, emerging from some wood in an unfrequented road, they entered the village they sought.

The sermon that morning was from the text, ‘Son, go work to-day in my vineyard.’ The largest congregation of the Summer had gathered.

It will not do to say that the horse knew the road. Returning in broad daylight the next day, though directed and directed again, we lost the way and went seven miles out of our course.

A scientist might laugh at this way of driving, or at asking God to guide in such trivial matters. But we shall still believe that God led the horse and blessed us in our attempt to serve him.

Order my steps in thy word: and let not any iniquity have dominion over me.

Psalm 119:133

June 22: Praying to stop the wind!

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle has many accounts of answers to prayer – and today’s highlights the danger of recreation. Yes recreation can be good, but far too many people put temporal pleasure above securing eternal pleasure. However we will see that a mother’s prayers can change nature!

The late aged and venerable Rev. Dr. Cleaveland of Boston, relates the following incident:

In a revival of religion in the church of which he was pastor, he was visited one morning by a member of his church, a widow, whose only son was a sailor.

With a voice trembling with emotion, she said, “Dr. Cleaveland, I have called to entreat you to join me in praying that the wind may change.”

He looked at her in silent amazement.

“Yes,” she exclaimed, earnestly, “my son has gone on board his vessel; they sail to-night unless the wind changes.”

“Well, madam,” replied the doctor, “I will pray that your son may be converted on this voyage; but to pray that God would alter the laws of his universe on his account, I fear is presumptuous.”

“Doctor,” she replied, “my heart tells me differently. God’s Spirit is here. Souls are being converted here. You have a meeting this evening, and if the wind would change, John would stay and go to it ; and I believe if he went he would be converted. Now, if you cannot join me, I must pray alone, for he must stay.”

“I will pray for his conversion,” said the doctor.

On his way to the meeting he glanced at the weather-vane, and to his surprise the wind had changed, and it was blowing landward. On entering his crowded vestry, he soon observed John, sitting upon the front seat.

The young man seemed to drink in every word, rose to be prayed for, and attended the inquiry meeting.

When he sailed from port the mother’s prayers had been answered; he went a Christian.

The pastor had learned a lesson he never forgot. The Lord had said, “O woman, great is thy faith, be it unto thee, even as thou wilt.”