September 7: Answered prayer for restored reason

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Yet another answered prayer from the 1857 Revival from the writings of Daniel Whittle:

“Last March, I requested you to pray for a dear friend in Massachusetts, who was deprived of her reason through sickness and great trouble. Give thanks unto God, she is fully restored.”

[15] Lord, have mercy on my son: for he is lunatick, and sore vexed: for ofttimes he falleth into the fire, and oft into the water.
[18] And Jesus rebuked the devil; and he departed out of him: and the child was cured from that very hour.
[19] Then came the disciples to Jesus apart, and said, Why could not we cast him out?
[20] And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.
[21] Howbeit this kind goeth not out but by prayer and fasting.

Matthew 17

September 6: Church Unity thru prayer!

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle shares another account from the 1857 Prayer Meeting Revival:

“It is with heartfelt gratitude to God that I write you of answer to your prayer. Last Spring, I asked your prayers in behalf of our church. It was almost destroyed by a man trying to get into our Conference without proper papers, and could not. He then broke up a Presbyterian church, and formed another. He gathered a number of our members with him, and tried hard to take our parsonage, but did not succeed. Thank God! though we are few, and have had a hard struggle, we still hold our property, our circuit has doubled, God is reviving His work, and is now answering your prayers”

That there should be no schism in the body; but that the members should have the same care one for another.

1 Corinthians 12:25

September 5: The old healed, the young saved

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle shares some more first hand accounts from the 1857 Fulton Street prayer meeting, begun by Jeremy Lanphier.

“The poor, sick old lady for whom I requested your prayers some time since, wishes to return thanks to Almighty God, for restoring her health, and sending friends. It is wonderful how your and our requests are answered.”

“Give thanks with me. Since I wrote you last, our son has given himself to Jesus.”

Rejoicing in hope; patient in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer;

Romans 12:12

September 4: Does God answer ‘unspoken’ prayer requests?

Sometimes in church prayer meetings they ask for a show of hands for who has an ‘unspoken’ prayer request – something that we feel unable to share in public, but is a burden on our heart. We know the Spirit intercedes with us:

Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.

Romans 8:26
Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

But is it worthwhile to share even ‘unspoken’ prayer requests with a group? Daniel Whittle addresses this with another record from the 1857 Prayer Meeting Revival:

“A few weeks since I sent a request for prayer in my behalf, asking you to pray God very earnestly that He would grant me the desire of my heart, for which I was praying almost unceasingly. On the evening of the same day on which I supposed you would receive my request, the answer came,lifting a great burden from my heart. I send this in acknowledgment of God’s loving-kindness to me, and to encourage’ every burdened, praying one, to trust Him more.”

Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you.

1 Peter 5:7

August 29: Fulton Street Prayers for Friends

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle shares a short item today from the records of the Fulton Street Prayer Meeting:

“Some time since, I sent request for prayer for the conversion of friends. Since then three have united with the church.”

The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.

2 Peter 3:9

Let’s be praying for the salvation of our friends as well!

August 28: Fulton Street deliverance of a daughter

Another testimony from the 1857 Fulton Street Prayer Meeting Revival as recorded by Daniel Whittle:

I pray you give God praise and thanks for His merciful deliverance of my dear daughter from the evil influence of the man to whom she had given her love and promise of marriage. THE LORD gave her strength and courage to break her engagement, in answer to our earnest prayers. Oh, implore Him to keep that man out of her path, for he is constantly lying in wait to meet her when she goes out. He wanted her to read bad books, but told her that they were not wrong. He constantly laid temptation in alluring forms before her. To HIM alone be the thanks for this step she has taken.

Be not deceived: evil communications corrupt good manners.

1 Corinthians 15:33

August 27: Answered prayers from the Fulton Street Prayer Meeting

The LORD redeemeth the soul of his servants: and none of them that trust in him shall be desolate.

Psalm 34:22
Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle records many answers to prayer from the Fulton Street Prayer Meeting Revival. In 1857, following Jeremiah Lanphier’s invitation to pray, thousands packed the churches of New York City and many cities across the nation for noon-time prayer meetings. Here’s what person wrote:

“Some three weeks ago, I wrote you, stating that my business had been a failure, and asked your prayers that God, in His mercy, would point out a way for me to provide for my family. The clouds grew thicker and blacker, but the more earnest were my prayers. Last Saturday the Lord came to my rescue, and provided me with the necessities of life, and to-day I wish you to join with me in thanksgiving to Almighty God for these favors;–‘For He is good; His mercy endureth forever.'”

August 14: He controls the winds and the waters

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle recounts how in “Memorials of Methodism in Virginia,” Dr. W.W. Bennet relates the following incidents in the life of John Easter, one of the pioneer ministers who labored there nearly one hundred years ago: He is represented as being the most powerful exhortatory preacher of his day. His faith was transcendent, his appeals irresistible, his prayers like talking with God face to face. Perhaps no man has ever been more signally honored of God as an instrument in the conversion of souls. On one of his circuits eighteen hundred members were added to the church in a single year.

Many thrilling scenes under his preaching yet linger among the people in those counties where he principally labored. A most extraordinary display of his faith was witnessed in Brunswick. At Merritt’s meeting- house a quarterly meeting was in progress, and so vast was the concourse of people from many miles around, that the services were conducted in a beautiful grove near the church. In the midst of the exercises, a heavy cloud arose, and swept rapidly towards the place of worship. From the skirts of the grove the rain could be seen coming on across the fields. The people were in consternation; no house could hold one-third of the multitude, and they were about to scatter in all directions. Easter rose in the midst of the confusion–“Brethren,” cried he at the top of his voice, “be still while I call upon God to stay the clouds, till His word can be preached to perishing sinners.” Arrested by his voice and manner, they stood between hope and fear. He kneeled down and offered a fervent prayer that God would then stay the rain, that the preaching of His word might go on, and afterwards send refreshing showers. While he was praying, the angry cloud, as it swiftly rolled up to them, was seen to part asunder in the midst, pass on either side of them, and close again beyond, leaving a space several hundred yards in circumference perfectly dry. The next morning a copious rain fell again, and the fields that had been left dry were well watered.”

August 12: The Wonderful $25

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle shares the following incident, marvelous, as at the time of its occurrence neither party had ever been known to each other:

In New Haven, Conn., lives a little invalid widow, almost helpless, with no one upon whom to rely for support, and only indebted to friendly acquaintances for a temporary home. With no money, no acquaintances, she had nowhere else to turn to but to the Father of all good. She had prayed often, and often had answers, but this time, though needing money, still she received none. The answer was long delayed; she was almost discouraged. “Was God at last to fail and forget her? No, it could not be. Let God be true even if I perish, I shall still cling to Him. I can not give Him up.”

Just at that time a business man in New York, who had been absent on a long journey for the Summer and had just returned, happened to pick up a note among many hundred lying on his desk, and noticed that the writer asked for some trifling favor, saying she was poor, had no means.

Her circumstances were unknown: he knew nothing but her name. He was eager to minister to the little ones of the Lord, and felt deeply impressed in prayer that morning, in asking a blessing on his day’s labors, that he might be able to help the need of some of “his children” who might then be in want. In his business hours the thought came over him with the depth of emotion, “WHAT CAN I DO? LORD, THY SERVANT IS READY.” Just at that moment he picked up this note of the little invalid, who asked the trivial favor, saying it would be such a comfort. (No money whatever was asked for in this note.)

Suddenly the thought came to him, “Perhaps this is my very opportunity. This may be the Lord’s little one in need.” But there was nothing in the letter to indicate she was a Christian. She solicited no money or pecuniary help.

Immediately there came to his mind, amid floods of tears, “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least of these, my children, ye have done it unto me.” Instantly he understood it as a message from the Lord, and the intimation of the Holy Spirit. He immediately sat down and wrote a check for $25, and enclosed it to her, saying, “I know not your need; you have not asked me for help, but I send you something which may be useful. I trust you are a Christian. I shall be happy to learn if it has done good, and made you happy. Give me no thanks. The Lord’s blessing is enough for me.”

The letter was sent and forgotten, but a strange presentiment came over the mind of the writer. “I am afraid I did not direct that letter right.” He sent a second postal card, asking if a letter had been received at her home; if not, to go to her post office and inquire.

Now notice the wonderful singularity of incident. Here is a man sending money, never asked for, to an unknown person, about whom he knew nothing; then misdirecting his letter, and then remembering and sending another message to go and find where the first had gone to. But notice the marvelous result. The little invalid received the postal card, but not the letter. She sent to the post office, and sure enough there was the first letter with its misdirection. She was just in time to save it from being sent to another woman of the same name living in another part of the same city.

She opened her letter, and with tears of thankfulness perused this wonderful reply, a marvelous witness to the power of an overruling Spirit, who had directed everything.

“My heart is full, that God should so answer my simple prayer. I first asked him for $10, then $15, and then for $25. I asked him for $25 several times, and was astonished at my boldness, but the amount was so fixed in my mind, I could not ask for anything else, and then I humbly trusted it to Him, and from that time I thought, I will not name any sum; let it be as He knows my need. And how He has honored my simple faith and trust in these dark days. Your letter contained exactly the $25 I prayed for. I have not had $1.50 to spend this Summer. I have suffered for everything. But through it all I have felt such perfect faith in the Lord, that his hand was leading me, even when I could not see a step before me; and that He should move your heart to help me seems so wonderful, so good. I am so glad I can thank you now, but ah, so much “over there” where words will express so much more in the beautiful atmosphere of heaven. Your letter and kind gift was mailed the very same day that I was praying in great distress and trial. I knew not but that I should be without even a home. My verse was Psalms 50: 15. O, how I had to pray that day. So day by day I was comforted, and now to-day the answer has come.”

Here, then, is a portion of the story of a sweet life who trusted God, not as a God of the past, nor far off, but ever living, ever present, ever faithful, and believed Him able, willing, and that He would help her in her daily life. She tried her Lord, to prove if his promises were indeed true, and she clung to them to the very last. No one knew her need. No one knew what she was praying for. The stranger did not know anything of her. She had asked money of no one but the Lord. Hesitant ever, she dared not name any amount of the Lord, but that ever present Spirit of God guided her heart, made her fix the amount, and then touched the heart of the stranger and fixed the amount also in his mind, and then, by his own guidance saved the letter from being lost, and behold! when opened the prayer of the one and the gift of the other was the same.

What a comfort, what a privilege, then, it is for the true-hearted Christian thus to feel, “There is one who careth for us.”

August 11: A Remarkable Decision by a Jury

Daniel W. Whittle
Daniel W. Whittle

Daniel Whittle tells us of God’s help even in the courtroom!

And call upon me in the day of trouble: I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify me.

Psalm 50:15

“In one of our northern cities, a trial at law took place between a Christian and an infidel. The latter had sued the former for a heavy sum, falsely alleging his promise to pay it for some stocks which he claimed to have sold him. The Christian admitted AN OFFER of the stock, but protested that so far from promising the sum demanded, he had steadily refused to make any trade whatever with the plaintiff. Each of the parties to the suit had a friend who fully corroborated their assertions. Thus the case went before the jury for decision.

“The charge of the judge was stern and significant. ‘It was a grave and most painful task which devolved upon him to instruct the jurors that one of the parties before them must be guilty of deliberate and willful perjury. Their statements were wholly irreconcilable with each other; nay more, were diametrically opposite; and that either were innocently mistaken in their assertions was impossible.

“‘Your verdict, gentlemen,’ he said in conclusion, ‘must decide upon which side this awful and heaven-daring iniquity belongs. The God of truth help you to find the truth, that the innocent suffer not.’

“It was late in the day when the judge’s charge was given, and the finding of the jury was to be rendered in the morning. The plaintiff went carelessly from the court arm in arm with the wicked associate whom he had bribed to swear falsely on his behalf. The defendant and his friend walked away together in painful silence. When the Christian reached his home, he told his family of the judge’s solemn charge and of the grave responsibility which rested upon the jurors. ‘They are to decide which of us has perjured ourselves on this trial,’ he said; ‘and how terrible a thing for me if they should be mistaken in their judgment. There is so little of any thing tangible for their decision to rest upon, that it seems to me as if a breath might blow it either way. They cannot see our hearts, and I feel as if, only God could enable them to discern the truth. Let us spend the evening in prayer that he may give them a clear vision.'”

The twelve jurymen ate their supper in perplexed silence, and were shut in their room for deliberation and consultation. “I never sat in such a case before,” said the foreman. “The plaintiff and defendant have sworn point-blank against each other; and how we are to tell which speaks the truth, I can not see. I should not like to make a mistake in the matter; it would be a sad affair to convict an innocent man of perjury.” Again there was silence among them, as if each were weighing the case in his own mind. “For myself I feel as if the truth must be with the defendant; I am constrained to think that he is an honest man. What say you, gentlemen?” Every hand was raised in affirmation of this opinion. They were fully persuaded of its truth, and gave a unanimous verdict accordingly.

Thus the Christian man was rightfully acquitted, and gave thanks to God, with a new and stronger confidence in the power of prayer. “Call upon me in the day of trouble; I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify me,” saith the Lord.